WHAT IS A PRESSURE SORE AND WHY DO THEY HAPPEN?




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What is a pressure sore?

A pressure sore is an area (also called pressure ulcer) which is damaged severely because of the loss of blood flow. It is the blood flow that keeps the area alive, lack of which means it will be damaged.

Why do they happen in the first place?

Following a serious injury, sensory nerves are damaged such that their messages do not any more reach the brain and are, thus, unable to warn the brain to change some ongoing activity such as sitting on some part of the body far too long. As a result of this, the patient has no warning signs to understand that he or she has been in some position long enough to damage the skin. Once the skin is damaged, blood supply to the area is cut off, causing damage to the tissue and therefore pressure a sore.

What are common high pressure situations causing a pressure sore?

Most common cases include:
1. Sitting too long in one position
2. Lying on bed too long without turning to other sides.
3. Shoes or clothes that are too tight
4. Sitting or lying on hard surfaces such as lying on a mattress with less than enough padding.
5. Cuts, bumps, falls or burns.

What kind of people are at high risk of developing a pressure sore?

1. Those who had a paralysis and has his muscles reduced. These people's skin will be less protected due to muscle loss.
2. Those who are overweight or underweight. Being overweight means it is harder to shift weight nad relieve pressure. Being underweight means your body has less padding to protect your skin.
3. Decreased blood circulation due to paralysis, smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, etc.
4. Wet or dry skin.
5. Aging also causes the skin to be thinner and dryer and therefore more fragile.
6. Alcohol or drug use might also lead people to ignore doing pressure reliefs.

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